Press Releases


1st March deadline for 2018 Hippocrates International Young Prize for Poetry and Medicine

2017 Hippocrates Young Poets judge, New Yorker Maya Catherine Popa, said: "It is wonderful that a prize with this kind of international visibility aims to encourage young writers from around the globe. As a teacher of this age group, I am often amazed at the creativity, insight, and skill of young writers. I wish more prizes aimed to showcase and support these voices.”

There has been a dramatic increase in international interest in recent years in the interface between medicine and the humanities in general, and in medicine and poetry in particular. Since its launch in 20013, the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine has attracted entries from Europe, North America, Africa and Asia, with winners from the USA, the UK and Hong Kong. 

All awards in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize are for a single unpublished poem of not more than 50 lines of text on a medical theme. There is a £500 prize for the Young Poets category in the international Hippocrates Prize.Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. There are further commendations in the Young Poets category.

Shortlisted poets will be informed by email and information about the shortlist and the commended entries posted on the Hippocrates Prize website. The winners in the 2018 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize will be announced by the judges on Friday 11th May 2018 in Chicago at the Hippocrates Awards ceremony.

Entries for the 2018 Hippocrates Young Poet sPrize close at 12 midnight ie the end of the day on 1st March 2018 in the relevant international time zone for entrants. 

To find out more about the 2018 prize, or to enter, click here.

Organiser Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such international interest in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize. We are also grateful that the 2018 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be hosted by the US Poetry Foundation in Chicago. 

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

The International Hippocrates Prize is also awarded in a further two categories:

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Open category, which anyone in the world may enter. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Health Professional category, which is open to Health Service employees, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Health Professional category


Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize  contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com




2018 Hippocrates Judges

The 2018 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize judge is Alisha Kaplan.

kaplan-author-photo- 3med

Alisha Kaplan is a poet from Toronto in Canada. She holds an MFA in Poetry from New York University, where she was a Rona Jaffe Fellow, and a BA from Barnard College, where she received a Lenore Marshall Barnard Poetry Prize. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Fence, DIAGRAM, Powder Keg, The Chicago Tribune, Carousel, and elsewhere. The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, in particular the healing possibilities of poetry. She won the Open Category in the 2017 FPM Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine.

Hippocrates Prize Organisers
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. He is also editor of The Warwick Review. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.


The Hippocrates Prize is supported by:
The Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine, a national medical society founded in 1918 and publisher of the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology.
The Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust which promotes education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

14th February deadline for 2018 Hippocrates International Health Professional Prize for Poetry and Medicine

2017 judge Neal Baer, producer of ER observed: ”Here the ordinary becomes extraordinary. These poems relate with emotional depth and in fresh and compelling ways what it means to be healthy and sick.”

There has been a dramatic increase in international interest in recent years in the interface between medicine and the humanities in general, and in medicine and poetry in particular. Since its launch in 2009, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8000 entries from over 70 countries, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. All awards in the Hippocrates Prize are for a single unpublished poem on a medical theme. 

The International Hippocrates Health Professional category is open to healthcare employees, including clinicians, researchers and health policy experts, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There is a £1000 first prize, a £500 second prize and a £250 third prize. There are a further ~20 commendations in the  health professional category

“These poems show us everything we have in common,’” said 2017 Prize judge Jackie Kay. "They help us with grief and grieving. But above all they make us cherish life, our health, our minutes and our hours. I’d keep these poems about me as my companions. They radiate light. One minute you’re reading a poem from a patient, the next a doctor, the next a nurse, the next a porter, the next a friend, the next a family member. One minute you’re reading a poem set in a standard hospital in the UK, the next a makeshift hospital in Iraq" 

Shortlisted and commended poets will be informed by email and information about the shortlist and the commended entries posted on the Hippocrates Prize website. The winners in the 2018 Hippocrates Health Professional Prize will be announced by the judges on Friday 11th May 2018 in Chicago at the Hippocrates Awards ceremony.

Entries for the 2018 Hippocrates Prize Health Professional category close at 12 midnight ie the end of the day on 14th February 2018 in relevant international time zone for entrants. 

To find out more about the 2018 prize, or to enter, click here.

With a prize fund of £5500 for winning poems in the Open International category and NHS category, and £500 for the Young Poets Award, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem. The prize comprises a 1st, 2nd and 3rd Prize and 20 commendations in each of the Open and Health Professional categories and further commendations in the Young Poets Award. 

Organiser Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such a distinguished panel of judges for the 2018 Hippocrates Prize, which has since its launch attracted interest from over 70 countries. We are also grateful that the 2018 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be hosted by the US Poetry Foundation in Chicago. 

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

The International Hippocrates Prize is awarded in three categories:

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Open category, which anyone in the world may enter. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Health Professional category, which is open to Health Service employees, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Health Professional category

- a £500 prize for the Young Poets category in the international Hippocrates Prize for an unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. There are further commendations in the Young Poets category.

Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize  contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com




2018 Hippocrates Judges

The 2018 Hippocrates Awards judging panel includes for International Open and International Health Professional categories Mark Doty, USA, Carol Rumens, UK, Dr Peter Goldsworthy, Australia and for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize Alisha Kaplan, Canada.

Mark Doty is an American poet. He has won man literary awards, including the Whiting Writer’s Award, the T. S. Eliot Prize, the National Poetry Series, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the National Book Critics’ Circle Award, the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for first nonfiction, and the National Book Award for Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems (2008). A resident of Provincetown, Massachusetts, Doty teaches at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Peter Goldsworthy divides his time between medicine and writing.  He has won literary awards across a wide range of genres, including the 1982 Commonwealth Poetry Prize, the 1988 Australian Bicentennial Poetry prize, the FAW Christina Stead Award for fiction, and a Helpmann Award, with composer Richard Mills,  for the opera Batavia.  Five of his novels have been adapted for the stage;  his 1995 novel ‘Wish’ was recently rereleased in the Text Australian Classics series, and his 1989 novel ‘Maestro’ as an Angus & Robertson Australian Classic. His most recent book is ‘The Rise of the Machines and other love poems’, published last year.

Alisha Kaplan is a poet from Toronto. She holds an MFA in Poetry from New York University, where she was a Rona Jaffe Fellow, and a BA from Barnard College, where she received a Lenore Marshall Barnard Poetry Prize. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Fence, DIAGRAM, Powder Keg, The Chicago Tribune, Carousel, and elsewhere. The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, in particular the healing possibilities of poetry. She won the Open Category in the 2017 FPM Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine.

Carol Rumens is the author of 14 collections of poems, as well as occasional fiction, drama and translation. She has received the Cholmondeley Award and the Prudence Farmer Prize, and was joint recipient of an Alice Hunt Bartlett Award. Her most recent publication is the prose book, Self into Song, based on three poetry lectures delivered in the Bloodaxe-Newcastle University Lecture Series. She is currently professor in creative writing at Bangor University, and is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Her latest collection is De Chirico's Threads, published by Seren Books.

Hippocrates Prize Organisers
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. He is also editor of The Warwick Review. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.


The Hippocrates Prize is supported by:
The Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine, a national medical society founded in 1918 and publisher of the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology.
The Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust which promotes education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

14th February deadline for 2018 Hippocrates Open Prize for Poetry and Medicine

“These poems show us everything we have in common,’” said 2017 Prize judge Jackie Kay. "They help us with grief and grieving. But above all they make us cherish life, our health, our minutes and our hours. I’d keep these poems about me as my companions. They radiate light. One minute you’re reading a poem from a patient, the next a doctor, the next a nurse, the next a porter, the next a friend, the next a family member. One minute you’re reading a poem set in a standard hospital in the UK, the next a makeshift hospital in Iraq” 

There has been a dramatic increase in international interest in recent years in the interface between medicine and the humanities in general, and in medicine and poetry in particular. Since its launch in 2009, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8000 entries from over 70 countries, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. All awards in the Hippocrates Prize are for a single unpublished poem on a medical theme. 

The International Hippocrates Open awardswhich anyone in the world may enter, are a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category

2017 judge Neal Baer, producer of ER observed: ”Here the ordinary becomes extraordinary. These poems relate with emotional depth and in fresh and compelling ways what it means to be healthy and sick.”

Shortlisted and commended poets will be informed by email and information about the shortlist and the commended entries posted on the Hippocrates Prize website. The winners in the 2018 Hippocrates Open Prize will be announced by the judges on Friday 11th May 2018 in Chicago at the Hippocrates Awards ceremony.

Entries for the 2018 Hippocrates Prize Health Professional category close at 12 midnight ie the end of the day on 14th February 2018 in relevant international time zone for entrants. 

To find out more about the 2018 prize, or to enter, click here.

With a prize fund of £5500 for winning poems in the Open International category and NHS category, and £500 for the Young Poets Award, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem. The prize comprises a 1st, 2nd and 3rd Prize and 20 commendations in each of the Open and Health Professional categories and further commendations in the Young Poets Award. 

Organiser Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such a distinguished panel of judges for the 2018 Hippocrates Prize, which has since its launch attracted interest from over 70 countries. We are also grateful that the 2018 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be hosted by the US Poetry Foundation in Chicago. 

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

The International Hippocrates Prize is awarded in three categories:

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Open category, which anyone in the world may enter. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category

- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Health Professional category, which is open to Health Service employees, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Health Professional category

- a £500 prize for the Young Poets category in the international Hippocrates Prize for an unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. There are further commendations in the Young Poets category.

Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize  contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com




2018 Hippocrates Judges

The 2018 Hippocrates Awards judging panel includes for International Open and International Health Professional categories Mark Doty, USA, Carol Rumens, UK, Dr Peter Goldsworthy, Australia and for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize Alisha Kaplan, Canada.

Mark Doty is an American poet. He has won man literary awards, including the Whiting Writer’s Award, the T. S. Eliot Prize, the National Poetry Series, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the National Book Critics’ Circle Award, the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for first nonfiction, and the National Book Award for Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems (2008). A resident of Provincetown, Massachusetts, Doty teaches at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Peter Goldsworthy divides his time between medicine and writing.  He has won literary awards across a wide range of genres, including the 1982 Commonwealth Poetry Prize, the 1988 Australian Bicentennial Poetry prize, the FAW Christina Stead Award for fiction, and a Helpmann Award, with composer Richard Mills,  for the opera Batavia.  Five of his novels have been adapted for the stage;  his 1995 novel ‘Wish’ was recently rereleased in the Text Australian Classics series, and his 1989 novel ‘Maestro’ as an Angus & Robertson Australian Classic. His most recent book is ‘The Rise of the Machines and other love poems’, published last year.

Alisha Kaplan is a poet from Toronto. She holds an MFA in Poetry from New York University, where she was a Rona Jaffe Fellow, and a BA from Barnard College, where she received a Lenore Marshall Barnard Poetry Prize. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Fence, DIAGRAM, Powder Keg, The Chicago Tribune, Carousel, and elsewhere. The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, in particular the healing possibilities of poetry. She won the Open Category in the 2017 FPM Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine.

Carol Rumens is the author of 14 collections of poems, as well as occasional fiction, drama and translation. She has received the Cholmondeley Award and the Prudence Farmer Prize, and was joint recipient of an Alice Hunt Bartlett Award. Her most recent publication is the prose book, Self into Song, based on three poetry lectures delivered in the Bloodaxe-Newcastle University Lecture Series. She is currently professor in creative writing at Bangor University, and is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. Her latest collection is De Chirico's Threads, published by Seren Books.

Hippocrates Prize Organisers
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. He is also editor of The Warwick Review. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.


The Hippocrates Prize is supported by:
The Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine, a national medical society founded in 1918 and publisher of the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology.
The Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust which promotes education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

At the London launch of the Hippocrates Book of the Heart

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart was launched in London on Wednesday 6th December 2017. See the launch programme.

This book, published by the Hippocrates Press on behalf of the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine, was made possible by the support of the healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust.

The book brings together eighty contemporary poets of the English-speaking world and a dozen medical experts from around the globe to offer their perspectives on the heart.

Since ancient times, the heart has been understood as the seat of the emotions, of the will, even of the soul. Over time, a fuller medical understanding of the organ has gradually evolved too, with Harvey’s first complete account of the circulation of the blood and the heart’s role (1628) and Dr. Christiaan Barnard’s first successful heart transplant (1968) marking key moments in a history that has given us a much better understanding of our hearts – and how to ensure they stay healthy.

In compiling this book, the editors invited poets around the English-speaking world, both prominent and less well-known, to contribute poems about the heart, written from any perspective, whether clinical or fanciful, medical or metaphorical. Among the poets are Griffin Poetry Prize winners Roo Borson and David Harsent, Forward Prize winners Sean O’Brien, Hilary Menos and Nick Mackinnon, former New Zealand Poets Laureate Elizabeth Smither and C. K. Stead, former National Poet of Wales Gwyneth Lewis, and President of PEN International Jennifer Clement. They are joined by many other distinguished and rising poets, including Robert Gray, John Kinsella, Peter Goldsworthy, Stephen Edgar and Geoffrey Lehmann from Australia; Anna Jackson, Jenny Bornholdt and Chris Price from New Zealand; Grace Schulman, Rafael Campo, Matthew Thorburn, Debora Greger and Jeffrey Harrison from the US; Marilyn Bowering and Kenneth Sherman from Canada; Justin Quinn, Mary O’Donnell and John F. Deane from Ireland; and Jane Draycott, Philip Gross, Mimi Khalvati, Lawrence Sail and Penelope Shuttle from the UK.

Leading medical professionals whose practice and research has led them to a keen interest in the health of the heart contribute information and advice to the book. In clear, crisp mini-essays they illuminate the nature of heart disease, the key risk factors, the history of cardiac surgery, and the most important steps every one of us can take in trying to maintain a healthy heart. Our medical professionals, based in Russia, Finland, The Netherlands, France, the UK, Australia and Hong Kong, agree in their core message: maintaining a healthy heart is possible for every one of us, and is crucial to our overall health and well-being throughout our lives.

The result is that rare thing, a book that satisfies the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct.

Note to Editors

For more on The Hippocrates Book of the Heart and other activities aimed at preventing heart and related disease: hearthealthycharity@gmail.com | 07494 450 805

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart edited by Wendy French, Michael Hulse and Donald Singer
ISBN 978-0-9935911-1-2   UK: £12  Ireland: €15  US: $18  CAN: $24  AUS: $24  NZ: $30
Order a printed copy of the book            Order the eBook

Heart book cover.jpg


Many of the contributors were in London for the launch of the book.

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Global perspectives on the heart: Hippocrates Book of the Heart launched in Toronto

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart edited by Wendy French, Michael Hulse and Donald Singer
ISBN 978-0-9935911-1-2   UK: £12  Ireland: €15  US: $18  CAN: $24  AUS: $24  NZ: $30


Order a printed copy of the book            Order the eBook

Art Makom

Art installation by Rochelle Rubinstein and Alisha Kaplan

This book, made possible by the generous support of the Cardiovascular Research Trust, brings together eighty contemporary poets of the English-speaking world and a dozen medical experts from around the globe to offer their perspectives on the heart.

Since ancient times, the heart has been understood as the seat of the emotions, of the will, even of the soul. Over time, a fuller medical understanding of the organ has gradually evolved too, with Harvey’s first complete account of the circulation of the blood and the heart’s role (1628) and Dr. Christiaan Barnard’s first successful heart transplant (1968) marking key moments in a history that has given us a much better understanding of our hearts – and how to ensure they stay healthy.

In compiling this book, the editors invited poets around the English-speaking world, both prominent and less well-known, to contribute poems about the heart, written from any perspective, whether clinical or fanciful, medical or metaphorical. Among the poets are Griffin Poetry Prize winners Roo Borson and David Harsent, Forward Prize winners Sean O’Brien, Hilary Menos and Nick Mackinnon, former New Zealand Poets Laureate Elizabeth Smither and C. K. Stead, former National Poet of Wales Gwyneth Lewis, and President of PEN International Jennifer Clement. They are joined by many other distinguished and rising poets, including Robert Gray, John Kinsella, Peter Goldsworthy, Stephen Edgar and Geoffrey Lehmann from Australia; Anna Jackson, Jenny Bornholdt and Chris Price from New Zealand; Grace Schulman, Rafael Campo, Matthew Thorburn, Debora Greger and Jeffrey Harrison from the US; Marilyn Bowering and Kenneth Sherman from Canada; Justin Quinn, Mary O’Donnell and John F. Deane from Ireland; and Jane Draycott, Philip Gross, Mimi Khalvati, Lawrence Sail and Penelope Shuttle from the UK.

Leading medical professionals whose practice and research has led them to a keen interest in the health of the heart contribute information and advice to the book. In clear, crisp mini-essays they illuminate the nature of heart disease, the key risk factors, the history of cardiac surgery, and the most important steps every one of us can take in trying to maintain a healthy heart. Our medical professionals, based in Russia, Finland, The Netherlands, France, the UK, Australia and Hong Kong, agree in their core message: maintaining a healthy heart is possible for every one of us, and is crucial to our overall health and well-being throughout our lives.

The result is that rare thing, a book that satisfies the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct.

Toronto Heart panel

Makom, Toronto, 16.11.17: 
Donald Singer, Ron Charach, Kenneth Sherman, Roo Borson, 
Kim Maltman, Ronna Bloom and Alisha Kaplan

The Canadian launch of the book was held at Makom in Toronto on Thursday 16th November. The programme included readings by Canadian poets Alisha Kaplan, Kenneth Sherman, Roo Borson and Kim Maltman. There was also a lively discussion panel on "More poetry: just what doctors and the public need?" In addition to the above poets the panel was joined by poet and psychotherapist Ronna and poet and psychiatrist Ron Charach, with a co-chairs: Alisha Kaplan and Donald Singer.

See more about the Toronto launch of the Heart book

Ronna Bloom is the author of 5 collections of poetry including The More (Pedlar Press, 2017). Her poems have been translated into Spanish and Bengali, recorded by the CNIB, and used in films, by architects, in education and health care. Her work appears in "Poetry is Public" and in the Toronto Public Library Poetry Map. She is currently Poet in Community at the University of Toronto and Poet in Residence in the Sinai Health System in Toronto. In these roles she offers students, health care professionals, patients and visitors opportunities to articulate their experiences through reflective writing and poetry. A meditator and psychotherapist, she lives in Toronto. 

Roo Borson's work has received the Griffin Poetry Prize and the Governor General's Award. Her most recent book of poetry is Cardinal in the Eastern White Cedar (2017), published by McClelland and Stewart/Penguin Random House. With Kim Maltman, she writes under the pen name Baziju, whose first book, Box Kite, was published in 2016 by House of Anansi Press.

Ron Charach is a poet, essayist, novelist and practicing psychiatrist. Born in Winnipeg, he has lived in Toronto since 1980 with his wife Alice, who is also a psychiatrist and researcher. His medically related poems are featured in two world anthologies of physician poetry published by the University of Iowa Press, Blood & Bone and Primary Care. His most recent books of poetry are Forgetting the Holocaust and Prosopagnosia, the latter of which was published by Toronto’s Tightrope Books. His poetry draws from the twin streams of literature and the healing arts.

Alisha Kaplan: The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, and the healing possibilities of poetry. She is a Torontonian poet, an editor for Narrative Magazine, and the winner of the 2017 Hippocrates Prize in Poetry and Medicine. She taught creative writing at New York University, where she received an MFA in Poetry. Her writing has appeared in Fence, DIAGRAM, Carousel, PRISM, The New Quarterly, and elsewhere.

Kim Maltman is a poet and theoretical particle physicist who teaches mathematics at York University. A past winner of the CBC Prize for Poetry, he has published five solo collections of poetry and three collaborative books, including Introduction to the Introduction to Wang Wei, written under the pen name Pain Not Bread and published by Brick Books.

Born in Toronto, Kenneth Sherman is the author of three books of prose and ten books of poetry. His most recent publications are Wait Time: A Memoir of Cancer and the poetry collection Jogging with the Great Ray Charles.

Donald Singer and Michael Hulse co-founded the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine in 2009. Singer is a clinical pharmacologist who has published over 200 articles, chapters and books on medicines, on cardiovascular research, prevention and treatment, and public understanding of health. He is an editor and contributor to The Hippocrates Book of the Heart (Hippocrates Press, 2017). He co-authors the prescribing safety guide Pocket Prescriber (Taylor & Francis) now in its 8th edition since 2004. He is President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. He is also on the Executive Committee of the European Association of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

University of Santo Tomas Faculty member poetry commended at the 2017 Hippocrates Awards

The Philippines QS WOWNEWS Issue 26: p48. August - October 2017

A Faculty member at the University of Santo Tomas College of Rehabilitation and Sciences, Dr Ma Arlene Lee-Ledesma, received a commendation for her poem, Grandfather’s Dementia, under the Health Professional Category of the 2017 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. She was the only Asian and Filipino among authors of the 29 poems which received commendations. The awards ceremony was held on 6 May 2017 at the Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA. 

Ma. Arlene Lee-Ledesma

Dr Ma. Arlene Lee-Ledesma

The 2017 Hippocrates Awards were organised by the Hippocrates Initiative in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School. They are composed of three categories, namely the Open Category, the Health Professional Category and the Young Poet Category. Currently in its 8th year, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8,000 entries from over 60 countries all over the world. 

All winning and commended poems in the Hippocrates Prize are published in the annual Hippocrates Prize Anthology. When asked about her inspiration for her poem, Dr Ledesma mentioned that “Memory and recall have been a favourite theme in my poems. I have correlated dementia, a medical condition which intrigued me, with the visual imagery of sky at dawn, and fascinated me as a child.” 


Writing to delight and instruct: the Hippocrates Book of the Heart

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart

edited by Wendy French, Michael Hulse and Donald Singer

ISBN 978-0-9935911-1-2

UK: £12  Ireland: €15  US: $18  CAN: $24  AUS: $24  NZ: $30

Publication: 21 September 2017

Order a print copy

Order the eBook

This unique book, made possible by the generous support of the Cardiovascular Research Trust, brings together eighty contemporary poets of the English-speaking world and a dozen medical experts from around the globe to offer their perspectives on the heart. The book will be launched in 3 continents this Autumn with readings in Sydney (26th September), Aukland (28th September), Toronto (16th November) and London (6th December) 

Slide1

Since ancient times, the heart has been understood as the seat of the emotions, of the will, even of the soul. Over time, a fuller medical understanding of the organ has gradually evolved too, with Harvey’s first complete account of the circulation of the blood and the heart’s role (1628) and Dr. Christiaan Barnard’s first successful heart transplant (1968) marking key moments in a history that has given us a much better understanding of our hearts – and how to ensure they stay healthy.

In compiling this book, the editors invited poets around the English-speaking world, both prominent and less well-known, to contribute poems about the heart, written from any perspective, whether clinical or fanciful, medical or metaphorical. Among the poets are Griffin Poetry Prize winners Roo Borson and David Harsent, Forward Prize winners Sean O’Brien, Hilary Menos and Nick Mackinnon, former New Zealand Poets Laureate Elizabeth Smither and C. K. Stead, former National Poet of Wales Gwyneth Lewis, and President of PEN International Jennifer Clement. They are joined by many other distinguished and rising poets, including Robert Gray, John Kinsella, Peter Goldsworthy, Stephen Edgar and Geoffrey Lehmann from Australia; Anna Jackson, Jenny Bornholdt and Chris Price from New Zealand; Grace Schulman, Rafael Campo, Matthew Thorburn, Debora Greger and Jeffrey Harrison from the US; Marilyn Bowering and Kenneth Sherman from Canada; Justin Quinn, Mary O’Donnell and John F. Deane from Ireland; and Jane Draycott, Philip Gross, Mimi Khalvati, Lawrence Sail and Penelope Shuttle from the UK.

Leading medical professionals whose practice and research has led them to a keen interest in the health of the heart contribute information and advice to the book. In clear, crisp mini-essays they illuminate the nature of heart disease, the key risk factors, the history of cardiac surgery, and the most important steps every one of us can take in trying to maintain a healthy heart. Our medical professionals, based in Russia, Finland, The Netherlands, France, the UK, Australia and Hong Kong, agree in their core message: maintaining a healthy heart is possible for every one of us, and is crucial to our overall health and well-being throughout our lives.

The result is that rare thing, a book that satisfies the Horatian dictum that writing should both delight and instruct.

The Hippocrates Book of the Heart is published by The Hippocrates Press. For more information about the Press and its publications, about Hippocrates Initiative for poetry and medicine and its annual international symposium on poetry and medicine, and about the Hippocrates Prize and the Hippocrates Society, please visit

www.hippocrates-poetry.org

Further inquiries and requests for interviews can be addressed to the editorial directors of the Press, Professor Michael Hulse (m.w.hulse@warwick.ac.uk) and Professor Donald Singer (hippocrates.poetry@googlemail.com).

 

Entries are open for the 2018 Hippocrates Young Poets' Prize for Poetry and Medicine

The International Hippocrates Prize for Young Poets' category is for an unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. With a £500 prize, it is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for young poets. The closing date is 1st March 2018. entries are welcome from individual young poets or as groups of entries from schools.

How to enter

The judge for the 2018 Young Poets Prize is Alisha Kaplan, a poet from Toronto. She holds an MFA in Poetry from New York University, where she was a Rona Jaffe Fellow, and a BA from Barnard College, where she received a Lenore Marshall Barnard Poetry Prize. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Fence, DIAGRAM, Powder Keg, The Chicago Tribune, Carousel, and elsewhere. The daughter of a printmaker and a psychiatrist, Alisha is very interested in the convergence of art and medicine, in particular the healing possibilities of poetry. She won the Open Category in the 2017 FPM Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. 

ALISHA KAPLAN

Kaplan author photo

About the Hippocrates Young Poets' Prize, 2017 Young Poets judge New Yorker Maya Catherine Popa, said: "It is wonderful that a prize with this kind of international visibility aims to encourage young writers from around the globe. As a teacher of this age group, I am often amazed at the creativity, insight, and skill of young writers. I wish more prizes aimed to showcase and support these voices."

The 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by the Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, founded in 1996, which promotes research and education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

The Hippocrates has two further categories:

- an Open category, which anyone in the world may enter;

- a Health Professional category for Health Professional-related staff and Health Professional students from anywhere in the world

Poetry and healing: the 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize

Poets from England, Singapore and the USA were finalists for the Prize for Young Poets aged 14 - 18 in this year’s international Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. 

Erin 2

The winner of the £500 Young Poet Award was announced at a ceremony at Harvard in Boston at the weekend - was Erin O'Malley, from Pennsylvania, USA.

Runners-up in the Young Poet Award were from the UK Roberta Maia Sher, London and Izzy Wythe, Oundle; from the USA, Rachel Litchman, Michigan and Joyce Zhou, Illinois;  and from Singapore Vernon Yian.

The Young Poet award is supported by healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, which has a particularly interest in promoting heart health among the young throughout the world..

About her winning poem, Erin said: “Alzheimer's Disease, A Proof By Exhaustion explores the way illness can destroy things that exist outside the body. At first, my grandfather's symptoms of forgetfulness didn't seem to have the immediacy of other bodily ailments; we often don't think of memory as an important aspect of our identity."

She added: "But when my grandfather lost the ability to recognize certain people in my family, it created a kind of distance between who he used to be and who is now, and I wanted to write something about that distance."

Erin O'Malley is  studying in Germany as a Speedwell Scholar. She is the co-founder of Sooth Swarm Journal and her work been recognized by Hollins University, Columbia College Chicago, the National Young Arts Foundation, the National Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.

Young Poets judge, New Yorker Maya Catherine Popa, said: "It is wonderful that a prize with this kind of international visibility aims to encourage young writers from around the globe. As a teacher of this age group, I am often amazed at the creativity, insight, and skill of young writers. I wish more prizes aimed to showcase and support these voices."

Notes for editors

For more on the shortlisted poets and the 2017 Hippocrates Awards,
contact +44 7494 450 805 or +1 617 432 5693 or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com



Hippocrates website: http://hippocrates-poetry.org

More on support for the 2017 Hippocrates Awards for Poetry and Medicine
The 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by the Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, founded in 1996, which promotes research and education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

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Judge Maya Popa at Harvard Awards with Donald Singer Cardiovascular Research Trust chair.

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

Maya Catherine Popa: 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets judge

Maya C. Popa.JPG

Maya Catherine Popa is a writer and teacher in NYC. A 2015 Ruth Lilly finalist, she is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation Editor’s Prize for review. Her poetry appears in Tin House, Kenyon Review, Poetry London, and elsewhere. Her criticism and non-fiction appear widely, including in Poetry, Poets & Writers Magazine, PN Review, and The Huffington Post. Her chapbook, “The Bees Have Been Canceled,” is forthcoming from DIAGRAM New Michigan Press in the U.S., and Southword Editions in Ireland, in winter 2017.

Her awards include the Hippocrates Poetry Prize, 2nd place in the Magma Poetry Prize, 3rd Place in the Narrative N30B Prize, the Gregory O’Donoghue Competition, Parallel Universe Competition, and the Oxford Poetry Society Martin Starkie Prize. She holds an MFA from NYU and an Mst in Writing from Oxford University, where she was a Clarendon Scholar. She teaches at the Nightingale-Bamford school in New York City.


Cherishing life and health: the 2017 Hippocrates Awards for poetry and medicine

Poets from Ireland, the UK, the USA, Australia and Canada are among the winners of major awards in this year’s £6,000 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, just announced at an awards ceremony at Harvard in the USA this weekend.

The judges were Pulitzer winner Jorie Graham, paediatrician and ER producer Neal Baer, Scotland's Makar (National Poet), Jackie Kay, New York poet Maya Catherine Popa, and New York Poet and psychiatrist Owen Lewis.

Unusually, the international Hippocrates Prize attracts both health professionals and established poets from around the world - with a strong emphasis on highly accessible poetry that comes from direct personal experience. This year the themes ranged from setting up a field hospital in Iraq, to recovery from depression, illness in children, breast cancer, and in the Young Poet's category, to a description of how Alzheimer's affects a grandfather's face. 

“These poems show us everything we have in common,’” said Jackie Kay. "They help us with grief and grieving. But above all they make us cherish life, our health, our minutes and our hours. I’d keep these poems about me as my companions. They radiate light. One minute you’re reading a poem from a patient, the next a doctor, the next a nurse, the next a porter, the next a friend, the next a family member. One minute you’re reading a poem set in a standard hospital in the UK, the next a makeshift hospital in Iraq" 

Neal Baer, producer of ER observed: ”Here the ordinary becomes extraordinary. These poems relate with emotional depth and in fresh and compelling ways what it means to be healthy and sick.”

The FPM Hippocrates Health Professional First Prize went to Kathy D’Arcy from Cork, Ireland for a poem exploring the human heartFirst runner-up was respiratory physician Andrew Dimitri from Sydney, Australia, who wrote about the challenges of setting up a field hospital near the Mosul front line. Andrew Dimitri also works a doctor for the international humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Second runner-up was Iora Dawes, from Stafford, who has worked as a medical social worker. Iora wrote about the experience of parents awaiting the outcome of surgery on a child in hospital. 

The FPM Hippocrates Open First Prize went to poet Alisha Kaplan from Toronto in Canada for a poem about recovery from depression. Runners-up were Claire Collison from London, England for a poem set in a natural oasis hidden on Hampstead Heath and Rosie Jackson from Somerset in England for a poem about alleviating mental distress. 

The winner of the Hippocrates £500 Young Poet Award was Erin O'Malley, Pennsylvania, USA writing about Alzheimer’s in her grandfather. The short-listed Hippocrates Young Poets were from the USA  Rachel Litchman, Michigan and Joyce Zhou, Illinois; from the UK Roberta Maia Sher, London and Izzy Wythe, Oundle; and from Singapore Vernon Yian.

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Young Poets judge Maya Catherine Popa said: "It is wonderful that a prize with this kind of international visibility aims to encourage young writers from around the globe. As a teacher of this age group, I am often amazed at the creativity, insight, and skill of young writers. I wish more prizes aimed to showcase and support these voices."

The judges also agreed a record twenty-nine commendations in the Health Professional category, reflecting the high quality of entries, with a further sixteen poems commended in the Open category, from poets from around the world: from the UK, Ireland, the USA and Canada, to Australia, Singapore, the Philippines and Switzerland.

Jorie Graham commented: “That so much raw suffering, clear-sighted understanding of the vicissitudes of fate, and the perhaps lucky accidents of medical knowledge, or chance, or compassion, could find their way through formal intelligence to these pages is barely short of a miracle. It is certainly a testament to the power of the imagination to heal, console, elegize and cry out against the terrible demands of life and destiny. It is hard to forget these voices once one inhabits their particular circumstances, their messages of belief and profound trust in the consolations of beauty.” 

Owen Lewis too was impressed by the skill and compassion shown in the poems: “As a poet and a physician, reading through the entries as one of the judges for this year’s Hippocrates Prize was a real page-turner. This exciting and moving array of poems speaks to the experiences of illness and health, of patient and healer. The poems are written with both immediacy and reflection, with craft and heart-felt expression.”

“I am very pleased to be supporting this year’s Hippocrates Prize for poetry and medicine,” said patron of the awards Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing. “These international awards are an excellent way to encourage people from around the world to take an interest in their health through poetry, as shown this year by entries from over 30 countries. The poems resonate with my sense of creativity.”

Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing

The Hippocrates Prize and this year's awards symposium were supported by the medical charity the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine - publishers of the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology, the healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, philanthropist Professor Anthony Fretwell-Downing, the Hippocrates Initiative and the Arts and Humanities Initiative of Harvard Medical School.

With a prize fund of £6000 /~ USD 7500 for winning and commended poems, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem. In its 8 years, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted over 8000 entries from over 60 countries, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. 

See more about the shortlisted poets and what inspired them.

Notes for editors

For more on the shortlisted poets and the 2017 Hippocrates Awards,
contact +44 7494 450 805 or +1 617 432 5693
 or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com



Hippocrates website

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

More on support for the 2017 Hippocrates Awards for Poetry and Medicine

The Hippocrates Open Awards and Health Professional Awards are supported by the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. The FPM is a UK medical society founded in 1918, which publishes the international journals the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology. 

The 2017 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by the Healthy Heart Charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, founded in 1996, which promotes research and education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.

Anthony Fretwell-Downing is former Advisory Board Chair of the University of Sheffield’s Management School and is currently a member of the CBI SME Enterprise Forum. 

2017 Hippocrates Judges

Neal Baer 

[photo by Gage Skidmore] is an American paediatrician, television writer and producer, best known for his work on the television shows ER and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Baer graduated from Harvard Medical School and completed his internship in Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Baer also holds a master’s degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.In 2000, he received an honorary Doctor of Laws from Colorado College.He received the Jerry L. Pettis Memorial Scholarship from the American Medical Association as the most outstanding medical student who has contributed to promoting a better understanding of medicine in the media.

Baer has written extensively on adolescent health issues, covering such topics as teen pregnancy, AIDS, drug and alcohol abuse, and nutrition.  Baer serves on the boards of many organizations related to health care, including the Venice Family Clinic, RAND Health, Children Now, the Huckleberry Fund of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.  Baer is a member of the Board of Associates at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He is currently engaged in work to improve the visibility of social determinants of health in media.

Jorie Graham is one of the most celebrated poets of the American post-war generation. She is the author of numerous collections of poetry, including Hybrids of Plants and Ghosts (1980), Erosion (1983), The End of Beauty (1987), Region of Unlikeness (1991), The Dream of the Unified Field: Selected Poems 1974-1992 (1995) winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, Never (2002), Sea Change (2008), Place (2012), From the New World (2015), and Fast (2017), among others. Born in New York City, Graham was raised and educated in Italy and France. She attended the Sorbonne in Paris, where she studied philosophy, and New York University, where she pursued filmmaking. While in New York, she began writing and studying poetry, and went on to earn an MFA from the Iowa Writer’s Workshop. She later taught at the Writers’ Workshop, leaving to join the faculty at Harvard as the Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, a position previously held by Seamus Heaney and a chair whose occupants date back to John Quincy Adams. She was the first woman to be awarded this position.

Jackie Kay [photo by Mary McCartney] was named Scots Makar—the National Poet for Scotland—in March 2016. She is Chancellor of the University of Salford and Professor of Creative Writing at Newcastle University. Jackie Kay was born and brought up in Scotland. The Adoption Papers (Bloodaxe) won the Forward Prize, a Saltire prize and a Scottish Arts Council Prize. Fiere, her most recent collection of poems, was shortlisted for the COSTA award. Her novel Trumpet won the Guardian Fiction Award and was shortlisted for the IMPAC award. Red Dust Road (Picador) won the Scottish Book of the Year Award, and the London Book Award. It was shortlisted for the J R Ackerley Prize. She was awarded an MBE in 2006, and made a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in 2002. Her book of stories Wish I Was Here won the Decibel British Book Award. She also writes for children and her book Red Cherry Red (Bloomsbury) won the Clype Award. She has written extensively for stage and television. Her most recent plays Manchester Lines(produced by Manchester Library Theatre) and The New Maw Broon Monologues (produced by Glasgay) were a great success. Her most recent book is a collection of stories, Reality, Reality. She is currently working on her new novel, Bystander.

Owen Lewis, is the author of two collections of poetry, Marriage Map (Dos Madres Press, January, 2017) and Sometimes Full of Daylight (Dos Madres Press, 2011) and two chapbooks. Best Man (Dos Madres Press, 2015) is the recipient of the 2016 Jean Pedrick Chapbook Prize of the New England Poetry Club. Other prizes include the 2016 International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, second prize in the 2017 Paumanok Award, as well as awards from The Mississippi Review, Connecticut River Review, the Kent and Sussex Poetry Society (UK), the London School of Jewish Studies, and a Pushcart nomination. He is a psychiatrist and professor at Columbia University where he teaches with the narrative medicine group, and an adjunct professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Maya Catherine Popa is a writer and teacher in NYC. A 2015 Ruth Lilly finalist, she is the recipient of the Poetry Foundation Editor’s Prize for review. Her poetry appears in Tin House, Kenyon Review, Poetry London, and elsewhere. Her criticism and non-fiction appear widely, including in Poetry, Poets & Writers Magazine, PN Review, and The Huffington Post. Her chapbook, “The Bees Have Been Canceled,” is forthcoming from DIAGRAM New Michigan Press in the U.S., and Southword Editions in Ireland, in winter 2017.

Her awards include the Hippocrates Poetry Prize, 2nd place in the Magma Poetry Prize, 3rd Place in the Narrative N30B Prize, the Gregory O’Donoghue Competition, Parallel Universe Competition, and the Oxford Poetry Society Martin Starkie Prize. She holds an MFA from NYU and an Mst in Writing from Oxford University, where she was a Clarendon Scholar. She teaches at the Nightingale-Bamford school in New York City.


 © Hippocrates initiative 2012: hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com